When we last left Jan Melnik…she was an Amazon quarter-finalist

 
We’re catching up with Jan Melnik, who let us in on the backstage thoughts and fears of an author entering Amazon’s Breakthrough Novel Award contest. When we last saw her, she had made it (along with 99 others) into the quarter-finals, meaning that she had triumphed over 9,900 other would-be winners, and was awaiting (sadly, with the flu) the final results.
Click here for part one of her story.
Would she win?
Here she is, to wrap up the story:

The five weeks stretching from Amazon’s Breakthrough Novel Award contest quarter-finalists’ announcement to the much-anticipated release of those advancing to the semi-finals seemed far longer than just 35 days. As most quarter-finalists in the running admitted on the increasingly active discussion boards, the closer it got to the announcement date of April 16, the more difficult it was to concentrate on any meaningful work. Being a first-time participant in the process, I naively figured nothing would be known until Tuesday at noon. The two previous notifications from Amazon had occurred between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Eastern. While I thought I might have a little difficulty sleeping Monday night, I wasn’t prepared to also lose sleep on Sunday night. 

But early into Sunday evening, the discussion board started popping with posts from writers: “PWs are in!” Most everyone remaining in the contest at this point (me and some 99 other happy campers who’d advanced this far) had pre-consoled ourselves with the idea that “no matter what the outcome of the contest is, we’re thrilled to be getting reviews from Publishers Weekly.” That was the prize offered by Amazon to all quarter-finalists.

So the refresh buttons on probably 100 laptops around the globe (many participants were from countries other than the United States) were nearly worn out as we eagerly watched for our individual Publishers Weekly reviews to be uploaded. And that exercise continued into Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday… Thursday! Whether a glitch or just somewhat sloppy administration, Publishers Weekly reviews appeared without any logical pattern to populate writers’ accounts intermittently and incredibly slowly over the next four days. Meanwhile, Amazon promptly announced the five semi-finalists, as promised, on April 16. Disappointingly (for me), “Telling Tales: On Merlin’s Island” did not make this cut.

I wasn’t to receive my review, though, until Thursday, which–at that point–was certainly anticlimactic. The majority of the 95 authors not advancing in the semi-finals shared their misery on the discussion boards, many of us slightly jaundiced in our belief that the attention given to the writing of our individual reviews might, in some way, be lacking–given the absence of any incentive to make it glowing (we authors learned that PW had paid its ad hoc reviewers a total of $400 to read ten book-length manuscripts in less than 30 days… some of the skeptical among us questioned the impetus a reviewer might have to write a great review knowing that the manuscript being judged had already ‘lost’ the contest). 

That skepticism was rewarded for many of us. When my own review finally posted on Thursday, I’d prepared myself (I thought) not to hope for too much–“just a pull quote or two” I could use in agent-shopping and publisher-marketing. That was not to be (as one of my kids would write here: sad face). Unless I decide to take the novel in a really different direction, the only possibly language I could extract from the review that read remotely positively was: “The sex scenes are thoroughly and competently written and Nicole’s character comes to life.” As a fellow writer penned about her own negative review, “Ouch.”

Alas, this was an incredible journey for this fledgling novelist and all is certainly not lost. I did receive many positive reviews on Amazon’s site those five weeks my novel excerpt was posted for the world to see. Amazon’s own Vine critics gave my book outstanding reviews. And interspersed among some of the more painful PW feedback were actionable clauses that I’ll heed seriously as I bring out my red pen (and X-ACTO knife) in a pursuit to polish “Telling Tales” for its next journey.
There’s editing work to be done, networking activities to begin in a quest for an agent, and a new novel ready to spill forth on my laptop. And if next January finds me with “Telling Tales: On Merlin’s Island” still without a publishing berth, I’ll happily resubmit the by-then new-and-improved manuscript to the 2014 ABNAs, a wiser, more savvy contestant. Stay tuned…
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2 thoughts on “When we last left Jan Melnik…she was an Amazon quarter-finalist

  1. Here’s my take-away message from this, Jan: Congratulations and huge huzzahs for being chosen as a quarter-finalist! Nicole’s character comes to life–that positive feedback is no small feat in the world of writing! And last but not least, you have earned the right to wear an arm band that reads: “ask me about thorough, competent sex” (scenes) at any important, upcoming family events in the near future!

  2. What a terrific experience for you. I offer sincere congratulations for your work’s standing and for taking the chance, and, WHEN Telling Tales: On Merlin’s Island is published I expect a notice…can’t get Nicole out of my mind. And now that the word is out about her “sexual competency” well it’s simply unfair to leave your audience without the details..
    Looking forward to your next novel, whether it’s Telling Tales: revised, or a different work completely. Your use of the language and chararter development is wonderful.

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